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ELED 405 Book Survey and Resource Website

This blog is my final project for ELED 405: Books and Materials for Elementary Schools.
Materials posted here include children's literature, professional articles, and online resources all relating to the theme of being an "outsider."
Jul 29 '12

Quick Links

Here are the links to my rationale, my online resources, and my professional readings all in one post.

Rationale:

http://eled405.tumblr.com/post/28008855935/book-survey-rationale

Online Resources:

http://eled405.tumblr.com/post/28272311854/online-resources

Professional Readings:

http://eled405.tumblr.com/post/28273966686/professional-readings

Jul 29 '12

Professional Readings

This is a list of five professional readings that help teachers understand social isolation and the theme of being an outsider. There are a variety of readings included. Please refer to the annotations to learn more about each reading and why it was chosen for the survey.

Literacy: Reading and Teaching Texts as Resources for Identity Formation

This article examines the importance of reading as a way to shape the way we view ourselves and the world. This can be important for children who feel like outcasts because it is important to form a healthy identity. Literature can help do that by showing children people that they want to be like. This article is included in the survey because identity formation is an important part of childhood and adolescence. Teachers have the opportunity to help their students better understand themselves through literature. The books in this survey deal with characters who feel as if they do not fit in. Many children understand what that feels like.

Schachter, E. (2012). Literacy: Reading and Teaching Texts as Resources for Identity Formation. New York: Teachers College Record. (1-37)

Find it online: http://www.tcrecord.org.ezproxy.library.wwu.edu/library/content.asp?contentid=16415

Paying Attention to and Not Neglecting Social Withdrawal and Social Isolation

This article details the study of social interaction and social isolation in children.  This is an important article for teachers because it can help them understand that children who are outsiders are not all the same. They have varying needs. This is an extensive text with a lot of information about the psychology of social interaction, but it can be a good resource for teachers to help them better understand the research that has gone into this field of study.

Rubin, K. Coplan, R. (2007)Appraising the Human Developmental Sciences:Essays in Honor of Merrill-Palmer Quarterly: Paying Attention to and Not Neglecting Social Withdrawal and Social Isolation  Wayne State University. (156-178)

Find it online: http://books.google.com/books?id=Ob9qtPjEiUAC&dq=social+isolation+children%27s+literature&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Children’s Literature Review: Excerpts from Reviews, Criticism, & Commentary on Books for Children & Young People

This review lists over 600 authors and illustrators. The collection includes reviews, criticisms, information about the authors, and awards. This is a helpful resource for teachers because it condenses a lot of research that is necessary for choosing book children’s literature. Teachers can look at this review for information. This book is included in the survey because it can be a valuable resource for a teacher looking to create a bigger classroom library full of diverse books.

Burns, T. (2008) Children’s Literature Review: Excerpts from Reviews, Criticism, & Commentary on Books for Children & Young People. New York: Gale.

Find it online: http://books.google.com/books/about/Children_s_Literature_Review.html?id=sRdmAAAAMAAJ

Teaching Religious Diversity through Children’s Literature

Religion is a big part of many children’s lives. The United States is becoming more and more diverse, and this means that more religions are represented in schools. This can be positive and negative. While it is great to have diversity in the classroom, children who practice a different religion than most of their peers may feel isolated and even unwelcome. This article explains how children’s literature can be a valuable tool for teaching students about the many different religions in the world. When children have a better understanding of something, they are often less fearful of it. The article was chosen because it not only shows teachers how they can discuss religion, it provides a list of good books to use.

Green, C and Oldendorf, S. (2005) Teaching Religious Diversity through Children’s Literature. Maryland: Association for Childhood International (209-212).

Find it online: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ714449&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ714449

Awakening Social Consciousness: Homelessness in Children’s Literature

This article provides teaches with information on homelessness in America, as well as children’s book that deal with the subject of homelessness. There are many homeless people in our country, and it is quite possible that homeless children will be part of the classroom. Being homeless comes with a host of problems, one of which is being isolated at school. Homeless children often move around frequently, which makes it hard for them to make friends and become part of a group. This article highlights children’s literature that presents homelessness. By reading about this problem, it is possible that students can become more understanding about this issue. It can also help empower homeless students by showing them that they are valuable and cared about. This article was chosen for the survey because it can help teachers prepare children to be more accepting of homeless peers.

Herbeck, J. (2004) Awakening Social Consciousness: Homelessness in Children’s Literature. Book links (6-9).

Find it online: http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/12483781/awakening-social-consciousness

Jul 29 '12

Online Resources

This is a list of five online resources that relate in some way to the theme of being an outsider. Please read the annotations to learn more about each resource and why it was chosen.

Helping the Socially Isolated Child Make Friends

http://www.ldonline.org/article/19272/  

This article helps teachers understand how they can guide their students in friendship building. While some children seem to have more friends than they can count, others have a very hard time with social interaction. Being isolated from peers can lead to a multitude of problems. Teachers cannot always help every student, but they can at least become more aware of how to help their students. This article was included in the survey because social interaction is key to feeling a sense of belonging. Teachers can be more helpful if they have the necessary tools.

Lavoie, R. (2007)Helping the Socially Isolated Child Make Friends.New York: Simon & Schuster.

Teaching Resources

http://www.harpercollinschildrens.com/teachers/teachingresources.aspx

Harper Collins Publishing has a huge list of teaching resources that can be used in conjunction with their books. Activities and discussions are an important part of reading any kind of literature. When heavier themes are present, it becomes even more important to discuss and evaluate what is going on. This list provides teaching ideas for a wide variety of children’s books, so it goes beyond the theme of outcasts and isolation. teachers can chose to use the resources provided or use them to create their own activities. This resource was chosen because it can help teachers create meaningful activities that go along with literature.

Sesame Street: Kids Talk: Making Friends

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASdj7IGc8aQ

This Youtube video shows children responding to the question: “How do you make friends?” Their simple answers definitely work for some children, but others need more than just a “hello” to make a friend. This video could world as a discussion starter on why some children get left out. According to these kids, making friends is very easy. But is it always easy for everyone? This video is just one minute long, but it can lead to deeper conversations about how children create groups.

2010 Census Interactive Population Map

http://2010.census.gov/2010census/popmap/

This map allows users to explore the data collected during the 2010 US census. Each state provides information on their population. It is possible to see the ethnic and racial makeup of a state, as well as data on age, sex, and housing. It is also possible to compare different states. Teachers can use this tool to find out more about their states and the country. It can also be used in a classroom to spark discussion about different groups of people. Understanding diversity in many forms can help children be more open to making friends with children who have different experiences than them.

An Open Door to the Arab World

http://www.al-bab.com/

This website was designed for non-Arabs to learn more about Arab culture. Arab and Middle Eastern students face serious prejudice. A lot of anti-Middle Eastern sentiment comes from lies. Children hear that Muslims are terrorists, and they tend to believe it because they do not get any information telling otherwise. This website can help non-Arab teachers better understand this culture. When teachers are more educated, they can pass that knowledge on to students. This website was included in the summary because of the abundance of lies and hatred that is spread about Muslims. As a result, Muslims children are often ostracized in school, especially girls who wear hijabs.  Knowing more about Muslim culture can help students be more accepting of their Muslim peers.

Whitaker, B. (2011) An Open Door to the Arab World.

Jul 28 '12
     A Mango-Shaped Space details the life of Mia, a girl living with a rare condition called synesthesia. Mia sees letters numbers as colors! This makes school very difficult, and she has trouble relating to her classmates. When Mia meets other people with her condition, she empowers herself through education and peer support. This book was chosen because it highlights how conditions and disabilities can make people feel isolated from others. It was also a Schneider Family Award winner.
2004 Schneider Family Award winner
Mass, W. (2005). A Mango-Shaped Space. New York: Little, Brown.

     A Mango-Shaped Space details the life of Mia, a girl living with a rare condition called synesthesia. Mia sees letters numbers as colors! This makes school very difficult, and she has trouble relating to her classmates. When Mia meets other people with her condition, she empowers herself through education and peer support. This book was chosen because it highlights how conditions and disabilities can make people feel isolated from others. It was also a Schneider Family Award winner.

2004 Schneider Family Award winner

Mass, W. (2005). A Mango-Shaped Space. New York: Little, Brown.

Jul 28 '12
     Homeless Bird is the story of Koly, a young Indian girl who is set up in a arranged marriage. However, she is widowed shortly after marriage. There is nowhere for a 13-year-old widow to go. It is up to Koly to make a place for herself in the world. This book was chosen for the survey because it presents an outsider story that many people are not aware of. This book is also a National Book Award winner.
2000 National Book Award Winner
Whelan, G. (2001). Homeless Bird. New York: Harper Collins.

     Homeless Bird is the story of Koly, a young Indian girl who is set up in a arranged marriage. However, she is widowed shortly after marriage. There is nowhere for a 13-year-old widow to go. It is up to Koly to make a place for herself in the world. This book was chosen for the survey because it presents an outsider story that many people are not aware of. This book is also a National Book Award winner.

2000 National Book Award Winner

Whelan, G. (2001). Homeless Bird. New York: Harper Collins.

Jul 28 '12
     Fire From the Rock tells the story of Sylvia Patterson, one of the first black students selected to integrate Central High School in Arkansas. Sylvia is worried about the integration because of the hostile attitudes of the white townspeople. She fears being alone in an all-white school. However, she realizes that times are changing! This book was included in the survey because of Sylvia’s concerns about being isolated in a new school.
Draper, S. (2007). Fire From the Rock. New York: Dutton Juvenile.

     Fire From the Rock tells the story of Sylvia Patterson, one of the first black students selected to integrate Central High School in Arkansas. Sylvia is worried about the integration because of the hostile attitudes of the white townspeople. She fears being alone in an all-white school. However, she realizes that times are changing! This book was included in the survey because of Sylvia’s concerns about being isolated in a new school.

Draper, S. (2007). Fire From the Rock. New York: Dutton Juvenile.

Jul 28 '12
     The Plain Janes is a graphic novel that follows Jane, a transfer student from the city who ends up in suburbia. Jane feels like an outsider in her new school, but she eventually befriends three other girls named Jane. The girls decide to create a secret club that uses art as a form of expression and rebellion. This book is included in the survey because the Janes struggle to fit in, ultimately creating an entirely new group.
Castellucci, C. (2007). The Plain Janes. New York: Minx

     The Plain Janes is a graphic novel that follows Jane, a transfer student from the city who ends up in suburbia. Jane feels like an outsider in her new school, but she eventually befriends three other girls named Jane. The girls decide to create a secret club that uses art as a form of expression and rebellion. This book is included in the survey because the Janes struggle to fit in, ultimately creating an entirely new group.

Castellucci, C. (2007). The Plain Janes. New York: Minx

Jul 28 '12
     Rainbow Boys follows three high school seniors who are all coming to terms with their sexuality. Jason, Kyle, and Nelson are all at different stages of acceptance. Coming out isn’t easy, especially when bullies and parents threaten the boys’ happiness and safety.  The main characters represent three very different situations, showing that coming out and being gay is an individual experience that is not the same for everyone. This book was chosen because it deals with the issue of isolation, confusion, and fear that is often associated with coming out.
Sanchez, A. (2001). Rainbow Boys. New York: Simon & Schuster.

     Rainbow Boys follows three high school seniors who are all coming to terms with their sexuality. Jason, Kyle, and Nelson are all at different stages of acceptance. Coming out isn’t easy, especially when bullies and parents threaten the boys’ happiness and safety.  The main characters represent three very different situations, showing that coming out and being gay is an individual experience that is not the same for everyone. This book was chosen because it deals with the issue of isolation, confusion, and fear that is often associated with coming out.

Sanchez, A. (2001). Rainbow Boys. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Jul 28 '12
     Different Like Me is all about famous people who did not quite fit in. Quinn, a boy with Asperger’s Syndrome, can relate to people like Albert Einstein and Lewis Carroll. This story shows that people with disabilities are present in our culture. They contribute greatly to all areas of society. This book was chosen because it shows that it is okay to be different. Feeling left out can hurt, but it does not mean that that you can’t go on to do great things!
Elder, J. (2005), Different Like Me: My Book of Autism Heroes. New York: Jessica Kingsley Publishing

     Different Like Me is all about famous people who did not quite fit in. Quinn, a boy with Asperger’s Syndrome, can relate to people like Albert Einstein and Lewis Carroll. This story shows that people with disabilities are present in our culture. They contribute greatly to all areas of society. This book was chosen because it shows that it is okay to be different. Feeling left out can hurt, but it does not mean that that you can’t go on to do great things!

Elder, J. (2005), Different Like Me: My Book of Autism Heroes. New York: Jessica Kingsley Publishing

Jul 28 '12
     Those Shoes tells the story of Jeremy, a boy who wants the same cool new shoes that all the other kids at school have. He feels like he needs to have these shoes in order to be like the other kids. However, his Grandma explains to him that they only have money for warm winter boots, not the trendy shoes he wants so badly. Jeremy eventually assess the things he is thankful for. This book was chosen because it shows how children of lower socioeconomic status often feel like they stick out from a crowd because of their clothing.
Boelts, M. (2007). Those Shoes. New York: Candlewick.

     Those Shoes tells the story of Jeremy, a boy who wants the same cool new shoes that all the other kids at school have. He feels like he needs to have these shoes in order to be like the other kids. However, his Grandma explains to him that they only have money for warm winter boots, not the trendy shoes he wants so badly. Jeremy eventually assess the things he is thankful for. This book was chosen because it shows how children of lower socioeconomic status often feel like they stick out from a crowd because of their clothing.

Boelts, M. (2007). Those Shoes. New York: Candlewick.